Ailanthus Webworm Moth

photograph of an Ailanthus Webworm Moth on wildflowers

This Ailanthus Webworm Moth was making its way among wildflowers when I saw it in early September.


Eastern Carpenter Bee on Wildflowers I

photograph of an Eastern Carpenter Bee on wildflowers

The Eastern Carpenter Bee is easily confused with the American Bumble Bee.  While the bumble bee is covered covered in fuzzy hair, the carpenter bee is missing the fuzz from its abdomen.


Pennsylvania Leatherwing Beetle on Thin-Leaved Sunflower

photograph of a Pennsylvania Leatherwing Beetle on Thin-Leaved Sunflower

At first I thought the beetle on this thin-leaved sunflower was a soldier beetle but something didn’t look quite right.  Looking more closely I’ve identified it as a Pennsylvania Leatherwing Beetle.  According to insectidentification.org, the Pennsylvania Leatherwing Beetle is highly beneficial in their predation of aphids.  As a bonus, their quest for insect prey turns them into efficient pollinators.


Paper Wasp on Lance-Leaved Goldenrod

photograph of a paper wasp on lance-leaved goldenrod

I had a little trouble identifying this species of wasp but I believe it is a paper wasp.  In my experience they are not aggressive unless you disturb their nests.  In this case I was photographing wildflowers when the wasp approached to gather nectar.  I sat still, watched and photographed it and the wasp didn’t even seem to notice me.


Brown Anole On A Tree

photograph of a brown anole on a tree with lichen

My Grandmother used to call these brown anoles “tiny dinosaurs”.  It’s easy to see why.  I photographed this one on the side of a tree in Florida last winter.


Rat Snake Hunting in the Trees

photograph of a rat snake moving across the branch of a tree

This Rat Snake had no problem making its way through the trees when I encountered it on a hike in Central Virginia.


Skipper on Thin-Leaved Sunflower I

 

 

photograph of a skipper butterfly on a thin-leaved sunflower flower

 

Last Saturday morning I walked through an open field covered in wildflowers.  I always like diving into areas like that and discovering all the little things you would miss if you didn’t actually look for them.  On this particular morning I found the butterflies, bees, wasps, and dragonflies had their run of the meadow.  This little skipper was feeding on the nectar of thin-leaved sunflowers which dominated the field.

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 247 other followers