Tag Archives: RVA

Pink Cattleheart, I

Photograph of a Pink Cattle Heart butterfly

The Pink Cattleheart is a large, black butterfly with striking red, pink and white markings.

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Little Brown Butterfly, I

Photograph of a small, brown butterfly

I haven’t been able to identify this butterfly.  It was at the Butterflies LIVE exhibit at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden so it may not be native to the United States.  If anybody knows the species I’d appreciate a comment.


Common Morpho, I

Photograph of a Common Morpho butterfly resting on a leaf

This Common Morpho was kind enough to sit still while I photographed it head-on.  It’s a large butterfly with brilliant blue on the upperside of its wings and brown with black and yellow eyespots on the undersides.


Tiger Longwing On Coneflower

Photograph of a Tiger Longwing butterfly

I recently visited the Butterflies LIVE! exhibit at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden.  This photo of a Tiger Longwing on a red coneflower was one of my favorite shots from the trip.  If you’re in the Richmond area Lewis Ginter is definitely worth a visit.


Carolina Chickadee, II

photograph of a Carolina Chickadee on a branch

This Carolina Chickadee hopped around on this branch and never sat still for long.  Shortly after I took this picture two younger Carolina Chickadees appeared.  They must have been recently fledged and following mom (or dad) around to learn the ways of the world.

Weighing in at only 0.3 – 0.4 ounces (8 – 12 grams), the tiny Carolina Chickadees always inspire me.  How can something so small endure everything nature throws at it?  From snowy winters to droughts and heat waves, these little birds somehow endure it all.

Please click on the image above to see a larger copy of it.

 

 


American Goldfinch, female

photograph of a female American Goldfinch on a branch

During the breeding season the American Goldfinch has beautiful, bright yellow plumage that turns to a sort of olive green in the fall.  This female, decked out in her summer plumage, looks curious about something.  The males are similarly colored but sport a prominent black cap as part of their breeding plumage.

 


Five-Lined Skink 1

Five-Lined Skink 1

This Five-Lined Skink frequently hangs out near the gap in this brick wall.  I see it quite regularly and was able to get close enough to take a few good photographs.  Five-Lined Skinks are common in Central Virginia.  You can usually find them on old logs or on rock piles.  They never seem to stray far from good hiding places.