Tag Archives: Yellowstone National Park

Angry Ground Squirrel

wildlifehub

photograph of a ground squirrel barking in Yellowstone National Park

Late one evening I discovered a large colony of ground squirrels living around a tree.  I woke up early the next morning and quietly walked through their territory.  Doing so I began to realize the core group remained together near a tree but several individuals acted as perimeter security.  This one seemed to be warning the others of my presence.

View original post


Cliff Swallow Nests

wildlifehub

photograph of Cliff Swallow nests under the eaves of a building in Yellowstone National ParkCliff Swallows like to build their mud nests up high, out of reach of potential predators.  As their name implies, they frequently nest along steep cliffs.  This small colony of Cliff Swallows took advantage of the eaves of a public restroom and built their nests all along the back of the building.

View original post


Geothermal Features

photograph of geothermal features near Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park

The constant bubbling of mineral infused, hot water leaves colorful, thin layers of sediment throughout the geothermal areas of Yellowstone National Park.  The hot spring in the foreground of this photo reminds me of a lunar crater while the colorful cliff and distant steam behind it add to the other-worldliness of the scene.


Alpine Meadow

photograph of an alpine meadow in Yellowstone National Park

 

The boulders you can see in the this photograph were most likely deposited by glaciers quite some time ago.  Boulders like these are pretty common throughout the glacially carved valleys and meadows in Yellowstone National Park.


Zebra Swallowtail Among Arrowleaf Balsamroot

photograph of a zebra swallowtail butterfly feeding on arrowleaf balsamroot nectar

Hiking past a large patch of Arrowleaf Balsamroot, I noticed a Zebra Swallowtail drifting from flower to flower collecting nectar and unwittingly spreading pollen in the process.


Blondie

photograph of a blond bison in Yellowstone National Park

 

This bison sat resting on a hillside in Yellowstone National Park when we saw it.  Since most of the bison are dark brown we nicknamed this one Blondie.


Yellow-Bellied Marmot

wildlifehub

photograph of a Yellow-Bellied Marmot in Yellowstone National Park

This Yellow-Bellied Marmot was hiding in a large rock outcropping.  We watched it for a few seconds and then it took cover under the large rock just to the right of it.  Unable to get a good picture of it under the rock, I was about to turn and leave when it came back out and stared into the camera long enough for me to get this photo.

View original post


Dragon’s Mouth

photograph of the Dragon's Mouth steam vent in Yellowstone National Park

One of the geothermal features we liked best at the Mud Volcano in Yellowstone National Park was “Dragon’s Mouth”.  The combination of steam and the deep, hissing and gurgling sounds that occasionally come from the vent make the name somewhat self explanatory when you’re there.


Western Tanager

photograph of a Western Tanager in a pine tree in Yellowstone National Park

While hiking in Yellowstone National Park I noticed flashes of yellow in the pine branches overhanging the trail.  I stopped to check it out and saw a small group of Western Tanagers flying through the pines.  They didn’t remain in sight for very long so this was the only worthwhile photo I was able to capture.


American Bison Bull

wildlifehub

photograph of an American bison in Yellowstone National Park

An American bison bull stops to observe his surroundings as he makes his way across a hill in Yellowstone National Park.

The American bison is the only species of bison living in the United States and are abundant in Yellowstone.  They tend to take their time moving across the countryside but they can run up to 30 miles per hour, making them much faster than they look.  If they feel threatened bison will attack with their horns and each year ignorant tourists try to get too close and end up getting hurt.

View original post